Tag: black History

Integrating Lanier Jr. High School for Boys

By Michael February 3, 2017 0

Editor’s Note: This piece was written in 2009 on the 40th anniversary of the integration of Lanier Junior High School in Macon, Georgia.

I read with interest Tom Johnson’s (former head of CNN) plans for the Miller-Lanier 50th class reunion.  Mr. Johnson invited the 1959 class at Ballard-Hudson to lunch.  Fifty years ago this group could not sit together at the soda fountain in the old Davidson’s Department store in downtown Macon, Georgia. read more

Black History Opening Remarks

By Michael March 1, 2016 0
Black History Month 2016 has run its course this year. However, Black History is more than a month. Black History is an event that has significance three hundred and sixty-five days a year, and in leap years like this one, three hundred and sixty-six days a year. I was honored during Black History Month 2016 by two museums which document and maintain the rich cultural history of the Black community in America. First on Saturday, February 27, 2016, the Sights & Sounds Black Cultural Expo Museum presented me with a “Distinguished Honoree” award for service to humanity over the course of my lifetime. For a young man, such as myself, this was a humbling experience, especially as I believe that my greatest work is ahead of me. Then, on Sunday, February 28, 2016, I spoke at The Official Noble Hill-Wheeler Memorial Center in Cartersville, Georgia the first school for “colored children” built in Northwest Georgia by the Rosenwald Foundation. The goal of these museums is a noble one. Their importance is underscored given the fact that many entertainers who have reached a modicum of success in America argue for the proposition that it is no longer important, nor necessary to remember Black History in the larger context of the American experience. Miss Stacy Dash is the latest affluent Black person to denigrate the observance of Black History. She is joined by Whoopi Goldberg, Raven Symone, Charles Barclay and Morgan Freeman, just to list a few. Marcus Garvey said, “A people without a knowledge of  their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” The great historian W. E. B. Dubois said it thusly, “The past is the present, that without what was nothing is, but for the infinite dead, the living are but unimportant bits.” It is easy, therefore, to see how an absence of history in the context of the American melting pot  can lead to an out of sight, “outta” mind reality for any ethnic group. Young people should realize that the proselytizing glamour and athletic stars have found their money pipeline. These stars are fearful that they could lose their gravy train if, in the vernacular of the the 1960’s, “The Man” gets upset with the thrust of Black people for justice and equality under the color of American law. Seemingly, they are saying to the brothers and sisters who are not performing on the field or stage to “go slow, tone it down, don’t embarrass a politician who needs your vote. Be polite, we gonna get all of the gravy and you can relish in the fact that a brother or sister made it, skinning and grinning in front of “The Man.” During my speech to the group in Cartersville, I centered my opening remarks with an overview of why Black History Month started as a single week of Negro History and expanded to a month long celebration in 1970 that wraps up today for 2016. God forbid that the more wealthy Black people among us do not get their wish and this becomes our last observance of the role and scope of Black people in the American scheme of things. I then moved into the topic that will consume us as a society for the remainder of this decade, the need for “Reparatory Justice.” Kindly enjoy my opening remarks by clicking on the link below.

Black History Month Observance at Noble Hill-Wheeler Memorial …Harold Michael Harvey’s opening remarks during Black History program at The Official Noble Hill-Wheeler Memorial Center, February 28, 2016.

Posted by Harold Michael Harvey on Monday, February 29, 2016

Harold Michael Harvey is an American novelist and essayist, the author of Paper puzzle and Justice in the Round. He can be contacted at haroldmichaelharvey.com. read more

Why Do Blacks Not Feel The Bern?

By Michael February 22, 2016 45

Why do Blacks not feel “The Bern,” a twitter connection from my hometown of Macon, Georgia tweeted me the other day?

“Why are Blacks supporting the HRC Machine,” he tweeted. “I don’t get it. Can you explain? Is it the Jewish thing or the not electable argument?” read more

Farrakhan-Kennedy Unlikely Allies

By Michael October 24, 2015 0

CASCADE PRESS, ATLANTA, GEORGIA The Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and Attorney Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. are unlikely allies, but a confluence of history finds them on the same side of a raging war against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta.

Farrakhan, representative of the Nation of Islam emerged as a leader in his Muslim sect following the assassination of Kennedy’s uncle, President John F. Kennedy nearly 52 years ago. He became a vocal opponent against Malcolm X after Malcolm made disparaging comments about the  death of  President Kennedy. read more

Book Signings Set for Museum

By Michael April 27, 2015 0

Cascade Publishing House is please to announce book signings have been set at the Sights and Sounds Black Cultural Epo and Museum for essayist and novelist, Harold Michael Harvey.

Harvey will sign his new book, JUSTICE IN THE ROUND, during the month of May at the Sights and Sounds Black Cultural Expo Museum. The museum is located in the North Dekalb Mall, 2050 Lawrenceville Highway, Decatur, Georgia 30033. read more

Interview Financial Breeze Show

By Michael March 3, 2015 0

Harold Michael Harvey beginning interviewed on the Financial Breeze Show

https://soundcloud.com/thepraisehouse7/harold-michael-harvey-financial-breeze-show?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=facebook

Back in January, I had an interview on the Financial Breeze Show. The Financial Breeze Show is part of the Praise House Network. The Financial Breeze Show presented a  free-style interview format. It allowed me to cover a number of issues. We discussed my forthcoming book, Justice in the Round: Essays on the American Jury System, including Ferguson and Staten Island. I thought this interview on the Financial Breeze Show was important, so I wanted to bring it to the readers of my blog. read more

Black History Week 1969

By Michael February 7, 2015 7

It was the forty-fifth day of the year, the last day of Black History Week 1969. I was a senior at the Lanier Senior High School, probably no more than five feet eight inches tall, and weighing in, after being soaked in a rainstorm, at one hundred and fifteen pounds.

Lanier had opened its doors to educate white boys exclusively in Macon, Georgia, three years before Dr. Carter G. Woodson began the first observance of Negro History Week in 1927.  Most of the town’s leading white citizens had graduated from Lanier. Many did not go on to college. It was enough to have been a “Lanier Boy.” The discipline and bearing of a Lanier boy were unmatched by any white youngster growing up in Middle Georgia during that day. read more

Black History Month More Than a Month

By Michael February 6, 2015 0

Black history is more than a month. Black history is made every month. There is hardly a day that goes by when some black person does not make history.

Prior to 1927 there was not any observance of black history, nor of the accomplishments of black people. There had always been historical markers made by black people that changed the course of human history. Those events were usually whitewashed leaving the public to think that only white people had contributed to the development of civilization. read more

Dr. King On Economic Boycotts

By Michael February 5, 2015 0

During his last sermon, April 3, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke on economic boycotts. He believed that economic boycotts could be used to gain civil and political rights.

Dr. King, was a pragmatist. He realized that to bring about change in America it would require programmatic solutions.He knew the real power of the civil rights movement centered around the power of economic boycotts. read more

Dr. King’s Vietnam War Speech

By Michael February 4, 2015 2

Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke out against war during an address at Riverside Church in New York, April 4, 1967. Exactly one year later, Dr.  Martin Luther King, Jr. would breathe his last breath. Some say he should not have gotten himself involved in the Vietnam War. However, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. believed that it was his abounding moral duty to lift his voice up for peace. He made his position clear and the distance between him and President Lyndon B. Johnson began to widen. read more